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Back again
02-12-2015, 12:23 AM
Post: #1
Big Grin Back again
Hey guys it's been a while, glad to have found the site is still up. I could not remember the name and searched desperately till I found it. Good to be back.

I have a question, an interested one, I was wondering when you swap a motor in a car and everything goes right it turns on with the original computer that came in the car. But if you put the the computer from the donor car with the new engine it will not run. This is something I've wondered for a long time but not too familiar how exactly it's all tied together. I figured I ask here since you guys always been great with me. Thanks in advance.
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02-12-2015, 10:38 AM
Post: #2
RE: Back again
Yes, I have stumbled on that one too. Last time I changed an engine on a Chevy Astro I was moving right along. I spent a few minutes studying the donor vehicle and decided that since I had an entire van I could save pulling the harness apart and just flip the big end with the ECM and fuse box on top of the pile for the swap. This move probably saved me an hour's work till I got it installed then realized why it wouldn't stay running. I finally sat in the seat instead of reaching in the window and saw the "security light" flashing. (duh... hand slapping forehead!)

Most often it's a matter of anti-theft software built into the ECM that's tied into the steering column or the ignition key / lock. It will either kill the spark or the fuel pump if certain parameters don't match up and from my experience the code can only be changed by a dealer (programing a new replacement) or you can buy a non-coded replacement ECM as a reman unit in the aftermarket.

Hope that answers your question.
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02-12-2015, 09:45 PM
Post: #3
RE: Back again
Ok that make sense, never thought about that, I've asked lots of people including the master mechanic at jeep dealer and they look at me like (what) thanks Rupe was just curious.

Never afraid of sticking my hands in a repair, lots of headaches and tinkering has thought me the knowledge I have in the automotive industry.
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02-12-2015, 10:24 PM
Post: #4
RE: Back again
BTW, I was a master tech with Nissan years ago and while we were fairly progressive I would say the hardest part was not seeing the "outside world" of older vehicles because most dealers are geared toward staying abreast of the new stuff and seldom see cars over 3-5 years old. In our case we were kinda lucky in that we were a long established dealer and the next town was lower income, which means we had an interesting mix of stuff up to around 10 years old, but again, we're talking Nissan / Datsun only. Servicing older cars at a dealer is unheard of today.

The flip side is I work in a fleet shop these days so it's hard to keep up with the new stuff, but 45 years experience tells me where to look and I ask lots of questions.
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02-15-2015, 01:34 AM
Post: #5
RE: Back again
I know exactly what you are saying, I personally learned on my own work at several shops and not ase certified and know lots of stuff, where to start looking and going from the symptoms and go from there, while lots of these newer schooled mechanics with no experience take forever to diagnose something, I don't know transmissions but recently I took my blazer to a shop for a new sunshell, and know it leaks, they don't wanna fix it, all kinds of missing and loose bolts,the transfer case that I just replaced is cracked,and where the connections from the starter are dangling from where it's broken,and all get from them we only replaced the sunshell, everything else is not our problem, well $450 later and free damaged parts I decide to fix it my self, it's shops like this that gives us a bad name, I know my share and I have my share of customers that depend on me and if I break something I let them know and replace it free of charge, I learned in this business honesty goes a long way. If I don't know something I ask someone with more knowledge for info, if I don't think I can do the work I will send them somewhere else I can depend on. But for the future I will no longer send anyone to this wonderful shop that charged me to fix my blazer but damaged other things for free.

Ps sorry for the small book, just another lesson learned.

Never afraid of sticking my hands in a repair, lots of headaches and tinkering has thought me the knowledge I have in the automotive industry.
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02-15-2015, 11:36 PM
Post: #6
RE: Back again
You probably would have had some sort of legal recourse on your botched Blazer job. Since the sun shell is inside the transmission & the only way to get to it is to remove the transmission, the rest of the items they loosened to get to it absolutely are their responsibility! You could check the laws in your state to be sure but; here in PA, I carry 2 million in liability because a mechanic IS responsible for their work. I can even be responsible for other damages cause by a wrecked vehicle that I worked on if it is proven that my faulty work caused the accident. I know that the legal fees & time are sometimes not worth the effort, but sometimes the principle IS. And you might save another person the hassle by making that guy think about what it will cost him to keep doing shoddy work? Too late now, but food for thought if you hear of others having problems with his work. I love the last sentence you wrote! “...damaged other things for free.”

Thanks for using the forum,
Garner

Interested in Mining? Look here: Coal Mining, PA
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02-16-2015, 10:46 PM
Post: #7
RE: Back again
thanks garner, I looked into it and he has already dealt with a couple court cases and won, but the more cases he gets is going to be risky cause eventually the judge is going to see lots of cases and he'll get his. Time is a precious thing.

Never afraid of sticking my hands in a repair, lots of headaches and tinkering has thought me the knowledge I have in the automotive industry.
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