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Fuel smell in cabin
10-25-2015, 11:33 AM (This post was last modified: 10-25-2015 11:37 AM by jffalder@gmail.com.)
Post: #1
Fuel smell in cabin
2000 Subaru Outback:
Anyone know of a particular fuel hose/line that wears out quicker than other's? Like the Toyota 4-Runner's-Coolant bypass hose located on the back of the engine. I've owned two 4-Runners same hose everytime. Now, I own 2 Outback's a 2000 and 2009; the fuel smell is in the 2000, waitng on the 2009.
Thanks for suggestions and direction,
jffalder

2000 Subaru Outback- Fuel smell in car. Any paticular fuel hose/line that may wear out quicker that others?
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10-25-2015, 12:28 PM
Post: #2
RE: Fuel smell in cabin
Since it's an older vehicle you may want to consider it's not a hose but a rusty line or the metal part of the filler neck. Anything leaking enough to give you an odor will show a damp spot externally. I suggest crawling around the bottom side with a flashlight for an inspection, starting in the tank area. If you don't see anything right away you may need to take a ride around the block to splash the fuel around first. If you see nothing there then follow the fuel lines forward along the floor.

BTW, if you must jack it up to gain space be sure to use safety stands on solid ground!
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10-25-2015, 03:15 PM (This post was last modified: 10-25-2015 03:25 PM by jffalder@gmail.com.)
Post: #3
RE: Fuel smell in cabin
(10-25-2015 12:28 PM)Rupe Wrote:  Since it's an older vehicle you may want to consider it's not a hose but a rusty line or the metal part of the filler neck. Anything leaking enough to give you an odor will show a damp spot externally. I suggest crawling around the bottom side with a flashlight for an inspection, starting in the tank area. If you don't see anything right away you may need to take a ride around the block to splash the fuel around first. If you see nothing there then follow the fuel lines forward along the floor.

BTW, if you must jack it up to gain space be sure to use safety stands on solid ground!

(10-25-2015 12:28 PM)Rupe Wrote:  Since it's an older vehicle you may want to consider it's not a hose but a rusty line or the metal part of the filler neck. Anything leaking enough to give you an odor will show a damp spot externally. I suggest crawling around the bottom side with a flashlight for an inspection, starting in the tank area. If you don't see anything right away you may need to take a ride around the block to splash the fuel around first. If you see nothing there then follow the fuel lines forward along the floor.

BTW, if you must jack it up to gain space be sure to use safety stands on solid ground!

Thx, for the direction. Just finished tighten all the clamps. Figured I might as well degrease while I'm dismantled and can get to hidden areas. Drying now, then back on w/the parts. No signs of leaks in the grease and grime. Plenty of loose rubber line clamps, fingers cross. I'll know after she's dried out from bath.
Thanks again,
jffalder

Not sure how to reply to messages yet. But, want to say, Thx for the direction
jffalder
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10-25-2015, 07:45 PM
Post: #4
RE: Fuel smell in cabin
To make things easier just scroll the page down and on the bottom there's a "quick reply" box that eliminates quoting the rest of the thread. When done hit "post reply" and you are finished.
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10-26-2015, 12:59 AM
Post: #5
RE: Fuel smell in cabin
Found the quick reply, Thanks.
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