Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
2008 VW Jetta, 2.5 L, Automatic. SW Florida
02-24-2016, 12:02 AM
Post: #1
2008 VW Jetta, 2.5 L, Automatic. SW Florida
My wife and I purchased this vehicle in 2009 and the AC was perfectly cold. About 2 1/2 years ago, its stopped blowing cold. It was actually a slow progression. At first it took time to cool down then after several months it would take up to 1 hour to cool down. Now it just never gets cold. The heat works and it certainly blows air... just not cold air. I tried charging it with a $30 can of refrigerant recommended to me by the auto parts dealer but there was zero improvement. A few months ago I brought it to a local AC mechanic and he checked the compressor. Apparently its still "spinning" but still no cold air. He just seemed like he did not want to investigate any further and told me I needed a new compressor. As a side note, when it rains, my windows fog up inside the car to the point I cant see... Summer is coming fast! PLEASE HELP!

Nick
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-24-2016, 12:29 AM
Post: #2
RE: 2008 VW Jetta, 2.5 L, Automatic. SW Florida
You need to have a.c. dye out into your system and turn it on. Then you take an ultra violet light and look for anything glowing back at you and your leak will be in that area
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-24-2016, 01:00 AM (This post was last modified: 02-24-2016 02:27 PM by Rupe.)
Post: #3
RE: 2008 VW Jetta, 2.5 L, Automatic. SW Florida
Not to rain on your parade there Sandman, but if the compressor is spinning then there's a good chance the system is not empty so adding anything (dye or more freon) will likely not do the trick. With a proper diagnosis there are several likely suspects but until someone puts a set of gauges on it to read the pressures we are puting the cart before the horse.

If the pressures (high and low sides) are good or close enough then you probably have a blend door issue inside the heat / AC box. If the pressures are not right then at least the gauge readings will point a good tech toward the problem within the freon part. Within this part you have mechanical items, the compressor and it's clutch, and farther into the system there's things like the expansion valve, throttle suctioning valve, or a fixed orifice. (not sure which your system has) Of course NONE of this will do anything if the system is empty, which is where a set of gauges helps because that will show you if the pressure can go high enough on the "high side" and will also read how low the "low side" is as well. The AC system needs this pressure differential to make cold air and it's the job of the expansion valve (or TSV / orifice) to drop the pressure to the right reading.

Now, before we really jump the gun, many compressors might seem to turn because ther belt must move when the engine runs. That means the outside part of the pulley always moves. The key here is to notice if the center section also turns on command. (switch on) If you are not sure then with the engine off grab the center of the clutch with your hand and give it a twist. You will easily see what I mean and can go from there.

Anyway, it sounds like you need to visit a local shop to get it sorted out but an educated consumer will do better in the long run. Let us know if this info helps.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)