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1999 Chrysler Concorde Question
03-08-2017, 01:33 AM
Post: #1
1999 Chrysler Concorde Question
I have a 1999 CHRYSLER CONCORDE V6-3200 3.2L SOHC

I'm getting ready for emissions testing and trying to get a few stubborn readiness codes to reset to "Ok"

My questions are: Does the 1999 Chrysler Concorde have:

1. A Heated Catalyst ?
Some vehicles may have an electrically heated catalyst. This heater helps warm up a cold catalyst faster so that it can start working sooner which leads to earlier reduction of harmful emissions. This monitor will check to make sure that the catalyst heater is working.

My Catalyst Monitor is set at OK. So it got me to thinking maybe the car doesn't have a heated catalyst and that's why it's set to N/A.

2. A Secondary Air System ?
Some vehicles are equipped with a secondary air system, or air injection system. The air injection system is designed to place extra oxygen into the exhaust stream to reduce exhaust pollutants. This monitor checks the components, switches, and solenoids that are part of the air injection system. Click here to learn more about the Secondary Air System.

I can't find any drive cycle instructions that talk about what you have to do to reset these monitors. I'm using an Ancell AD310 ODB II scanner and these monitors are listed as N/A.

I also show an AC Refrigerant monitor set to N/A. . But we stopped recharging the AC years ago. Neither of us like AC. I'm guess the monitor can't run because there's no refrigerant to be monitored.

Thanks for any help.
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03-08-2017, 12:28 PM
Post: #2
RE: 1999 Chrysler Concorde Question
Probably no cat heater but these do have a heated O2 sensor, which will show up as either OK or a problem with a scan. Anything showing a "NA" on a scan means it's the info is Not Available and doesn't apply to this vehicle. IOW, not necessary to pass emissions testing. (like the AC system)

As for drive cycles needed, anything you find on the web is going to be like an old wife's tale. There are just too many variables to explain where engine temp needs to reach a certain point for a certain number of minutes or number of starts, number of cold starts and complete warm-ups, etc. Then there's a minimum number of miles / minutes at various throttle positions. You name it and it comes into play.... and it varies from car to car.

What I would do is use your scan tool to tell you when all monitors are either ready or "NA" and that will tell you when you can go for inspection. Anything that shows "incomplete" will need more time to fall into line, and if it doesn't there will be a code to chase down. Typically this will take a week and maybe 100 - 200 miles of mixed driving.

As a side note: In our state (Ct) they will give you a pass at one monitor not ready, which is usually reserved for "evaporative" controls on fuel systems. All others must be READY (or NA) to pass the test.
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03-08-2017, 04:03 PM
Post: #3
RE: 1999 Chrysler Concorde Question
Hi Rupe,

Thanks for answering. I had emailed Ancel a couple of times to get the definition of N/A with no response.

Yes, both the O2 monitor and O2 sensor heater are "O.k" And I have no incompletes.

I have 4 that are marked N/A:

- Heated Cat
- Evap System
- Secondary Air System
- AC Refrigerant

What are your thoughts on the Evap Systems Readiness Monitor? In Illinois I can go in with 2 monitors not ready.

Thanks for your help.

Sandy


(03-08-2017 12:28 PM)Rupe Wrote:  Probably no cat heater but these do have a heated O2 sensor, which will show up as either OK or a problem with a scan. Anything showing a "NA" on a scan means it's the info is Not Available and doesn't apply to this vehicle. IOW, not necessary to pass emissions testing. (like the AC system)

As for drive cycles needed, anything you find on the web is going to be like an old wife's tale. There are just too many variables to explain where engine temp needs to reach a certain point for a certain number of minutes or number of starts, number of cold starts and complete warm-ups, etc. Then there's a minimum number of miles / minutes at various throttle positions. You name it and it comes into play.... and it varies from car to car.

What I would do is use your scan tool to tell you when all monitors are either ready or "NA" and that will tell you when you can go for inspection. Anything that shows "incomplete" will need more time to fall into line, and if it doesn't there will be a code to chase down. Typically this will take a week and maybe 100 - 200 miles of mixed driving.

As a side note: In our state (Ct) they will give you a pass at one monitor not ready, which is usually reserved for "evaporative" controls on fuel systems. All others must be READY (or NA) to pass the test.
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03-08-2017, 10:05 PM
Post: #4
RE: 1999 Chrysler Concorde Question
For a 99 vehicle I would have thought there'd be an evap monitor, but there may be exceptions. OTOH, you may want to try another vehicle setting on the scan tool (change year?) just to verify it comes up as NA again, in which case you can do your test. Other things to verify would be that the tool sees "engine light off" and "no codes in storage" along with the list of "ok" or NA. In my case I use a smaller Actron unit and it's got a specific screen for state tests showing only these things. It also has a screen just for drive cycle monitors so I can leave it on the seat, go run some errands, and see when everything is ready.
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03-09-2017, 12:03 PM
Post: #5
RE: 1999 Chrysler Concorde Question
Thanks Rupe,

The Ancel does have one screen that shows the individual monitors and state. I only have monitors that are "Ok" or "N/A." That drive state screen would have made things easier. Which Actron monitor do you have?

My plan is to scan it one more time right before I go to emissions either today or tomorrow. They allow 2 monitors to not be ready. If the Heated Cat and Secondary Air System aren't features on the '99, then I'll hopefully pass with the Evap and AC monitors not set.

Thanks again for your help.

Sandy



(03-08-2017 10:05 PM)Rupe Wrote:  For a 99 vehicle I would have thought there'd be an evap monitor, but there may be exceptions. OTOH, you may want to try another vehicle setting on the scan tool (change year?) just to verify it comes up as NA again, in which case you can do your test. Other things to verify would be that the tool sees "engine light off" and "no codes in storage" along with the list of "ok" or NA. In my case I use a smaller Actron unit and it's got a specific screen for state tests showing only these things. It also has a screen just for drive cycle monitors so I can leave it on the seat, go run some errands, and see when everything is ready.
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03-09-2017, 12:17 PM
Post: #6
RE: 1999 Chrysler Concorde Question
I don't recall the model # of the scan tool I have. I bought it on sale for around $100 maybe 5 - 6 years ago because it was "outdated" but I have an older fleet going back to 99 so does the job well.

Going back to your situation, anything that comes up NA doesn't apply to your vehicle so should be no worries.

Good luck!
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03-09-2017, 12:32 PM
Post: #7
RE: 1999 Chrysler Concorde Question
Thanks Rupe!


(03-09-2017 12:17 PM)Rupe Wrote:  I don't recall the model # of the scan tool I have. I bought it on sale for around $100 maybe 5 - 6 years ago because it was "outdated" but I have an older fleet going back to 99 so does the job well.

Going back to your situation, anything that comes up NA doesn't apply to your vehicle so should be no worries.

Good luck!
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