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rear drum brakes
05-15-2017, 04:56 PM
Post: #1
rear drum brakes
i have no pressure to my rear brakes on my 2001 ford ranger. a little fluid comes out but no pressure.
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05-15-2017, 08:28 PM
Post: #2
RE: rear drum brakes
Sounds like either a hole somewhere or maybe a bad wheel cylinder
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05-15-2017, 09:38 PM (This post was last modified: 05-15-2017 09:44 PM by duc.)
Post: #3
RE: rear drum brakes
not leaking any where and no pressure on either side out the bleeders or the line.

i have front brakes but no pressure to the back
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05-15-2017, 10:11 PM
Post: #4
RE: rear drum brakes
Let's start from scratch and find out why you are trying to get fluid out the rear bleeders. What work / repair are you doing?

Just a bit of theory first: The rear brakes on most cars / light trucks (with or without ABS) is basically half of the system. The front is the other half and with ABS may be divided into both left and right so almost three systems, except that the front is pressurized by half of the master cylinder then divided by the ABS afterward.

That said, if you start with the MC, it's the side closer to the booster that powers the front brakes. The rear is pressurized by the end of the MC that's farther away from the booster. (usually closest to the front of the car) The movement of that portion of the MC is not directly coupled inside the MC but pushed by the hydraulic force of the fluid from the front brake portion.

What I am driving at is if you had the system open and allowed any air to enter you may have to bleed the front brakes first then do the rear. If the MC was allowed to go totally empty (say replacing the rear wheel cylinders?) then you will need to bleed at the MC to get a prime going BEFORE moving out to the wheels. IOW, get the air out of the MC first so you can start to build pressure.

Hints: NEVER allow the pedal to travel to the floor during bleeding or the MC will probably fail within a few weeks / months due to rust / pits in the bore. (the part that's never been used) If the dash light for the brakes wont go out then pump the pedal sharply. If it still stays on try cracking a front bleeder while someone holds the pedal. This will re-center the proportioning valve and allow you to continue bleeding the rear.
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05-15-2017, 10:45 PM
Post: #5
RE: rear drum brakes
i had line to the back changed about a month and a half ago and they worked fine. now no rear brake. i tried bleeding them and no pressure fluid just dribbles out no pressure.im thinking mc is bad so ill change that and see .
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05-15-2017, 11:55 PM
Post: #6
RE: rear drum brakes
Perhaps a classic case of what I said about pushing the pedal too far down during bleeding?

Let us know how that goes. It may help others reading here.
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05-17-2017, 03:05 PM
Post: #7
RE: rear drum brakes
where is the brake proportioning valve located on my 2001 ranger
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05-17-2017, 11:54 PM (This post was last modified: 05-17-2017 11:56 PM by Rupe.)
Post: #8
RE: rear drum brakes
I'm a little fuzzy on the exact location but if you start at the rear and follow the rear brake line you may find it on the frame above the rear dif or along the frame rail working your way forward. In that era it will have at least one electrical connector on it as well.

Here's the tricky part... because the Ranger is subject to various loading conditions it's tied into the ABS, which means if you try to by-pass it with a $2 union you will have the rear brakes locking up prematurely. Hunting around on line I see those things are problematic and selling for $100 - $200 so do your homework.

What I'd suggest is maybe buy a $2 union to see if that kinda solves your problem with bleeding, and if so, then invest in the proper part.

Let us know how you make out.

Edited to add: Since hind sight is always 20/20 I have to point out (after the fact) that this vehicle is 16 years old and likely will have rusty / frozen brake line fittings. You may want to try bleeding at the MC and if you can develop pressure there work you way back and see if any of the other rear lines are able to be broken free at each joint. IOW, you may wind up replacing all of the lines to do this job if the fitting are frozen.

Edited to add: I deleted the other thread on the same question to avoid confusion.
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05-23-2017, 07:13 PM
Post: #9
RE: rear drum brakes
it was the master cylinder that was my problem. thanks you the tips.
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05-23-2017, 09:47 PM
Post: #10
RE: rear drum brakes
Thanks for the follow up as not everyone does that.

Soooo, as we chatted about earlier... sounds like a classic case of someone pushing the pedal too far during the last bleeding of the system and it took 6 weeks to show up. Not as common as it once was but we still see stuff like this on a regular basis out in the field.
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