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1973 1600 vw engine
12-05-2011, 06:29 PM
Post: #1
1973 1600 vw engine
:(Hi i just got done rebuiling my 1600 vw engine 1973 using bugmevideo i put new pistons bearings cammshaft camshaft every seem to go well got everything together put back in car turned it over sounded like sucking air would not fire at all took the distributor out to check the drive it was in the right direction at tdc but had metal shavings all over the gear evreything turned over okay no binding if any body has any suggestions i would appreciate it thanks alot
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01-04-2012, 12:43 AM
Post: #2
RE: 1973 1600 vw engine
Just found this post from a year ago (and while I was on vacation) and was wondering how you made out?

Years ago I ran a VW unit shop rebuilding engines and transmissions of that vintage and I feel bad for not catching your question! Guessing I have overhauled at least 400 of those engines in my tme.
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01-04-2012, 06:37 PM
Post: #3
RE: 1973 1600 vw engine
(01-04-2012 12:43 AM)Rupe Wrote:  Just found this post from a year ago (and while I was on vacation) and was wondering how you made out?

Years ago I ran a VW unit shop rebuilding engines and transmissions of that vintage and I feel bad for not catching your question! Guessing I have overhauled at least 400 of those engines in my tme.

Hi i am still having trouble starting it still sounds like it is sucking air i did find find a couple of leaks where the rubber boot goes over the intake pipes didn,t have the clamps tight but still having same symptems
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01-05-2012, 12:10 AM
Post: #4
RE: 1973 1600 vw engine
I have to say that air leaks (vacuum leaks) are an issue with the later (70's vintage) air cooled engines and at near 40 years old even those simple carbs (Solex PICT-3) can be fickle.

If the ignition timing is correct and you got the cam correctly timed while the engine case was open, then it's a matter of the intake gaskets on each head and those rubber "boots" that connect to the center section. All must be leak free.

Here's what I would do... mostly because very few people understand the basic carburator set up.....

First make sure there are no external air leaks by spraying some carb cleaner at the above mentioned problem areas. (the boots and gaskets) In a pinch you can coat the boots with high temp silicone to seal any leaks instead of replacing them.

Next, unless you live in California this antique will never be inspected for emissions so remove the EGR valve (if it has one) and block the port in the manifold with a piece of aluminum flashing or soda can that you will cut to fit. Reinstall the EGR over this home made "blocking gasket" so everything is tight and there are no exhaust leaks either.

After that you need to go through the following steps with the carb adjustments....

The external speed screws on the linkage are as follows...

Back the screw off till there is just a hair of a gap between the end of the screw and bottom "step" on the choke while the choke is fully open. (air cleaner off and holding it with your finger) This will give you the proper idle while the engine is cold and the choke is working.

On the left side of the carb there are two screws in recessed holes. The small one is the idle mixture and the big one is the idle speed. (air bleed)

To start off bottom out the small screw (clockwise) and then open it about 2-3 turns. The head should still be well inside the recess.

Bottom out the big screw and open it about 3 turns as well. Should also be inside the recessed area.

On the right side of the carb there's a gold colored solenoid with a wire on it. The wire also goes up to the choke heater. Follow the wire and see if it has a good connection to the 12 volt side of the coil. It should have power when the key is on. Removing the wire should give you a clicking sound from the solenoid. This is the fuel shut off for the idle circuit so the engine doesn't "run on" when you shut the key off. If it's not working (clicking) then we need to talk more about this.

If everything is cooperation so far you can start the engine and let it warm up. After say 5 minutes the choke should be fully open and you can kick the idle down to do some fine adjustments.

ONLY ADJUST IDLE SPEED WITH THE BIG SCREW LOCATED ON THE LEFT SIDE. Get the idle speed close. Use a tach if you have one. Once the idle speed is close you can play with the mixture screw. Turn the mix screw in and out till you find the smoothest / fastest idle then back it out about 1/4 turn. After that play with the big screw till you have about 800 RPM.

If you need to play with the timing either use a timing light at idle or I can walk you through how to set it with a simple test light. Either way you can probably block off the vac hose to the back side of the distributor and only use the one that connects in the front and up to the side of the carb. This will give you timing advance but no timing retard for emissions. Base timing for decent driving is about 3-5 degrees advanced... NO MORE!

Let us know how you make out.
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10-23-2012, 02:04 PM (This post was last modified: 10-23-2012 09:58 PM by Rupe.)
Post: #5
RE: 1973 1600 vw engine
if you can find one of these old VW engines, i promise you its worth what its being sold for. these things will run forever if you know how to take care of em. trust me

*Edited by moderator to remove ad links. (last warning!)
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